Syllabus

Author Donna Barnes 9th Grade Classroom Book Collection Syllabus Non-Fiction Reading Reading Page



      Benjamin Franklin High School for Finance and Information

                  Ms. Donna Barnes- 9th Grade Teacher

                        DBarnes3@Schools.NYC.Gov

 

 *The titles of literature/works are subject to change. 

Unit

9.1

Assessments

Topic

Skills Included

Common Core Standard(s)

I

17 (90 min) lessons

Mid Unit:

Students write a multi-paragraph response to the following prompt:

Choose and explain one epigraph. Analyze the relationship between that epigraph and the girls’ development in that stage.

 

End-of-Unit:

Students write a formal, multi-paragraph response to the following prompt:

Analyze Claudette’s development in relation to the five stages of Lycanthropic Culture Shock.

 

 

 

“St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” by Karen Russell

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

 

Engage in productive evidence-based discussions about texts

 

Collect and organize evidence from texts to support analysis in writing

 

Make claims about texts using specific textual evidence

Use vocabulary strategies to define unknown words

 

RL.9-10.1

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.3

RL.9-10.4

RL.9-10.5

W.9-10.2.a, f

SL.9-10.1.b, c

SL.9-10.4

L.9-10.4.a, b

L.9-10.5.a

II

11(90 min) lessons

Mid-Unit:

Students write a formal, multi-paragraph response to the following prompt: Identify similar central ideas in Letters to a Young Poet and Black Swan Green. How do Rilke and Mitchell develop these similar ideas? formal, multi-paragraph response to the following prompt:

What is the impact of Rilke’s specific word

Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke, “Letter One,” pp. 3–12

 

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell, 24–28, 142–156

“Hangman” and “Solarium,” pp.

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

Engage in productive evidence-based conversations about texts

Determine meanings of unknown vocabulary

Independently preview text in preparation for supported analysis

Paraphrase and quote relevant evidence from a text

CCRA.R.9

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.3

RL.9-10.4

RI.9-10.2

RI.9-10.3

RI.9-10.4

W.9-10.2.a, f

SL.9-10.1.b, c

L.9-10.4.a, b

L.9-10.5.a

III

20 (90) min lessons

Mid-Unit:

Students write a formal, multi-paragraph response to the following prompt:

How does Shakespeare’s development of the characters of Romeo and Juliet refine a central idea in the play?

End-of-Unit:

Students write a formal, multi-paragraph response to the following prompt: Select either Romeo or Juliet. How does Shakespeare develop this character as a tragic hero(ine)?

 

 

 

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (excerpts)

 

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

 

Engage in productive evidence-based discussions about text

 

Collect and organize content from the text to support analysis in writing

Analyze an author’s craft

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.3

RL.9-10.4

RL.9-10.5

RL.9-10.7

W.9-10.2.a, c, f

SL.9-10.1.b, c

L.9-10.4.a-c

L.9-10.5.a

I

9.2

 

13 (90) min lessons

Mid-Unit:

Students will participate in an evidence-based discussion in which they will collect and organize evidence using an Evidence Collection Tool.

Students will then respond individually in writing to the following prompt:

Identify a central idea in “The Tell-Tale Heart” and discuss how point of view and structural choices contribute to the development of that central idea over the course of the text.

End-of-Unit:

Students will individually write a multi-paragraph essay addressing the following prompt: Identify a central idea shared by both texts, “I felt a Funeral, in my Brain,” and “The Tell-Tale Heart,” and make an original claim about how Dickinson and Poe develop and refine this idea.

 

“The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe

 

“I felt a Funeral, in my Brain” by Emily Dickinson

Read closely for textual details 

 

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis 

 

Engage in productive evidence-based conversations about text

 

Provide an objective summary of the text 

 

Make evidence-based claims

 

Participate in collaborative discussions 

Determine meaning of unknown vocabulary

 

CCRA.R.6

CCRA.R.9

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.4

RL.9-10.5

W.9-10.2.b, d

W.9-10.9.a

SL.9-10.1.a

L.9-10.1

L.9-10.2

L.9-10.5.ab

 

II

9.2

 

20 lessons

Using a tool to organize and scaffold their thinking, students will develop their claim, participate in an evidence-based discussion, and write a response to the following prompt:

What relationship does Sophocles establish between prophecy and Oedipus’s actions?

 

End-of-Unit:

Using a tool to organize and scaffold their thinking, students will develop their claim, participate in an evidence-based discussion, and write a response to the following prompt:

How does Sophocles develop the conflict between Oedipus’s guilt and his innocence?

Oedipus the King

by Sophocles

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

Provide an objective summary of the text

Engage in productive evidence-based conversations about text

Make evidence-based claims

Revise writing

Participate in collaborative discussions

Determine meaning of unknown vocabulary

RL.9-10.1.

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.4

RL.9-10.5

W.9-10.2.a, b, d, f

W.9-10.5

W.9-10.9.a

SL.9-10.1.a-d

L.9-10.1

L.9-10.2

L.9-10.4.a, b

L.9-10.5.a, b

 

 

 

 

“Everybody is guilty of Something”

 

Mid-Unit:

Students will draft a multi-paragraph analysis of how Mosley develops the central idea that humans are fascinated with true and fictional crime stories.

Students will use a writing rubric to peer-review responses for strength of evidence, and incorporate peer feedback into revisions of their own writing.

 

End-of-Unit:

Part 1: Students review annotations and responses to text-dependent questions for “True Crime,” “How Bernard Madoff Did It,” and The Wizard of Lies. Students generate open-ended questions to be used during the whole-class discussion.

 

Part 2: Students will analyze “True Crime,” “How Bernard Madoff Did It,” and The Wizard of Lies. Using a fishbowl method for discussion, students will both engage in a critical dialogue about the texts and assess their peers’ speaking and listening skills.

“True Crime: The roots of an American obsession” by Walter Mosley

 

 

“How BernardMadoff Did It” by Liaquat Ahamed

 

The Wizard of Lies by Diana Henriques,

 

 

 

 Epilogue

“$50bn Ponzi Scheme - How Madoff Did It”

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

Engage in productive evidence-based conversations about text

 

 

Determine meaning of unknown vocabulary

Provide an objective summary of the text

Paraphrase and quote relevant evidence from a text

Write original evidence-based claims

 

Critique one’s own writing and peers’ writing

Revise writing

Generate and respond to questions in scholarly discourse

RI.9-10.2

RI.9-10.5

RI.9-10.7

W.9-10.2.a, b

W.9-10.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.9-10.9.b

SL.9-10.1.a, c, d

SL.9-10.4

SL.9-10.6

 

 

.9-10.1

L.9-10.2

L.9-10.4.a

 

9.3

 

10 lessons

End-of-Unit:

Students complete a two-part short writing assessment.

 

Part 1: Students synthesize and compose a multi-paragraph response tracing the development and refinement of a central idea from chapter 1 of Animals in Translation.

 

Part 2: Students articulate in writing two or three areas of investigation and describe how and where each area emerged from Animals in Translation.

Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior by Temple Grandin and Catherine Johnson, Chapter 1

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

Engage in productive evidence-based discussions about text

Collect and organize evidence from texts to support analysis in writing

Analyze text and multimedia

Make claims about the development and refinement of central ideas in a text

Use vocabulary strategies to define unknown words

Identify potential topics for research within a text

Use questioning to guide research

Conduct pre-searches to validate sufficiency of information for exploring potential topics

RI.9-10.1.a

RI.9-10.2

RI.9-10.3

RI.9-10.4

RI.9-10.5

RI.9-10.7

W.9-10.4

W.9-10.7

W.9-10.8

W.9-10.9

SL.9-10.1.c

L.9-10.4.a, c, d

 

 

9.3

 

12 lessons

End-of-Unit:

 

Students turn in a completed Research Portfolio including their Research and Vocabulary Journals.

 

Evidence-Based Perspective: Additionally, students compose a one-page synthesis of their personal conclusions and perspective derived from their research. Students draw on the research outcomes, as developed in the Organizing Evidence-Based Claims Tools to express their perspective on their respective research question/problem.

Student research sources will vary.

Students choose texts for research based on their individual research question or problem.

 

Model research sources:

“The Brains of the Animal Kingdom” by Frans de Waal

“Minds of their Own: Animals are smarter than you think” by Virginia Morell

“Think You’re Smarter Than Animals? Maybe Not” by Alexandra Horowitz and Ammon Shea

“Monkeys Can Perform Mental Addition” by Science Daily

“Animal Intelligence: How We Discover How Smart Animals Really Are” by Edward Wasserman and Leyre Castro

Assess sources for credibility, relevance, and accessibility

Conduct independent searches using research processes including planning for searches, assessing sources, and annotating and recording notes

Develop, refine, and select inquiry questions for research

Develop and continually assess a research frame to guide independent searches

Collect and organize evidence from research to support analysis in writing

Make claims about inquiry questions, inquiry paths, and a research question/problem using specific textual evidence from the research

RI.9-10.1.a

RI.9-10.7

W.9-10.2

W.9-10.4

W.9-10.7

W.9-10.8

W.9-10.9

SL.9-10.1

L.9-10.4.a, c, d

 

III

 

8 lessons

 

End-of-Unit:

Part 1: Students shall be assessed on the final draft of their research paper, and its alignment to the criteria of an informative/explanatory text (W.9-10.2). The final draft should examine and convey complex ideas and clearly incorporate students’ evidence-based claims as well as appropriately cite sources. The final draft should accurately organize and demonstrate thoughtful analysis of the evidence gathered through research.

Student texts (research sources) will vary.*

 

*By Unit 3, students have chosen texts for research based on their individual research question/ problem.

Collect and organize evidence from research to support analysis in writing

Analyze, synthesize, and organize evidence-based claims

Write effective introduction, body, and conclusion paragraphs for an informational/explanatory research paper

Use proper citation methods in writing

Edit for a variety of purposes including using semicolons, colons, and correct spelling

Use formal style and objective tone in writing

Write coherently and cohesively

W.9-10.2.a-f

W.9-10.4

W.9-10.5

W.9-10.7

W.9-10.8

W.9-10.9

SL.9-10.1

L.9-10.2.a-c

L.9-10.3.a

L.9-10.6

 

5 lessons

Publish a version of your research paper on the class blog, using various multimedia components to enhance the reader’s understanding of your findings. Take advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and display it flexibly and dynamically.

Note: Bold

Student texts (research sources) will vary.

 

W.9-10.2.a-f

W.9-10.5

W.9-10.6

 

9.4

34 lessons

Mid-Unit:

Students draft an argument outline for the following prompt as their

Mid-Unit Assessment:

Who bears the most responsibility for ensuring that clothes are ethically manufactured?

Students use the Argument Outline Tool to organize their Mid-Unit Assessment response, collecting evidence and developing claims and counterclaims.

End-of-Unit:

Students will individually write a multi-paragraph argument essay addressing the following prompt: Who bears the most responsibility for ensuring that goods are ethically produced?

Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom and Science by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos

Supplementary Module Texts:

“Where Sweatshops Are a Dream” by Nicholas Kristof

“Bangladesh Factory Collapse: Who Really Pays for Our Cheap Clothes?” by Anna McMullen

 

“How YourAddiction to Fast Fashion Kills” by Amy Odell

“Globalization: The Growing Integration of Economies and Societies around the World” by the World Bank

Read closely for textual details

Annotate texts to support comprehension and analysis

Evaluate argument writing

Engage in productive evidence-based conversations about text

Collect and organize evidence from texts to support analysis in writing

Build skills for successful argument writing

Analyze authors’ use of rhetoric

Revise writing

Utilize rubrics for self-assessment and peer review of writing

Develop argument based writing

L.9-10.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Expectations

  • Be on time for class! Otherwise you will lose points and ability to go on school/class trips
  • Being in class everyday is extremely important. Absenteeism can cause lead you not having enough credits to graduate on time
  • All class work, homework and journals will be placed in the students own individual folder- This folder will hold all of your work for the year
  • Each student also needs to come to class with a ready, willing and able attitude- which means when you enter class, sit down and start doing the Do Now
  • Each student must be respectful to everyone in class -otherwise it will result in low grades and loss of class/grade trips
  • Do not copy assignments or other works from anybody- It is considered cheating

 

Grading Policy

Your grade will reflect your work, participation, and effort in this class.  Your grade will be determined according to the five areas below.

Course Description

 

 

Course Skills and Outcomes

 

Course Details

 

Area

Description

Percent

Daily Work-

Do Now, quick writes, journals, reading etc

 Range: 20%

Tests (quizzes) and Major Assignments

End of unit exams/quizzes

Range:  30 %

Projects- 

 

 Pages of play

Range: 20%

Homework

 

Vocabulary, reading of text etc

Range: 10 %

Class Participation

 

Reading out loud, assistance to teacher, etc

Range: 20%

 

Getting Help

Students if you're absent you need to exchange information with at least two peers in class. Get his or her number and contact him or her when you're out of class. You're still responsible for your work and will be accountable for the grade. You cannot fall behind on your work it will add up towards your final grade. If you need extra help please come and see me during lunch time, before school and or after school. You may also email me if you're in need of anything.

 

Additional Information